Staying focused

elevator pitch , focus , genre , writing tips

Wordly Musings

glasses-1246611_1280.jpg

Let’s start the new year talking about writing.

I can’t tell you the number of conversations I’ve had that start with this: “I’ve got a great idea for a book…”

And then we head into ten minutes of  ‘and then K jumps into a lake, but then S has a breakdown, and J thinks he’s got fleas, and then the planet is overrun by rabid titmice, and the president decides to give it all up and go fishing…’ and I have no idea what the book is about, and the person with the great idea has even confused themselves.

A piece of editorial advice before you sit down to write: know what you’re writing.

Not in depth, perhaps. Writers work differently, and some like a good solid outline while others prefer a more meandering, let’s-see-what-happens path. Both work, if you have some sense of what you’re writing about.

For instance…

View original post 393 more words

Goth is [not] Dead: (Sub)Genre-Chat

culture, fantasy, fiction, gothic, history, inspiration, learning, novel, romance, sci-fi, short stories, themes, writing

C. M. Rosens

Horace Walpole is credited/blamed for kicking off the ‘Gothic’ literature genre in 1765 with his novel The Castle of Otranto: A Gothic Tale, which was intended as a subtle joke. Walpole meant ‘Gothic’ in the sense of ‘barbarous’ or ‘derived from the Middle Ages’, but his supernatural tale of perverse obsession and melodramatic tragedy sparked something of a movement to which his epithet was permanently applied.

From the 1790s, novelists like Ann Radcliffe (surely the Grandmother of the Gothic Novel) rediscovered Walpole’s fevered imaginings and ran with them, even though her novels always had natural, Scooby-Doo-esque conclusions finally unravelled by her meddling-kid protagonists. They were beautifully trashy novels, (stereo)typically read by impressionable and repressed young ladies by candlelight (probably with their nightgowns delicately draped over heaving bosoms, which is how I like to imagine it). It took other, braver (or less inhibited) authors like Matthew Lewis and his…

View original post 2,743 more words