Literary Hoaxes: when fun turns into irritation.

art, hoaxes, literature, writing

Urban Vyaas

This post got triggered by the author of one of the websites I’m following who purposely broke up an ordinary text in pieces and presented it as a poem while illustrating this with a couple of pictures of some stupid gadgets in beautiful frames that were labeled as art. It was intended as a hoax, so no bad blood there.
Let’s start by admitting that all fiction has a little bit of a hoax into it; all of it a ruse, a trick, a mirage, a lie, a swindle, a fabrication, a forgery. It’s an art who lies in the hope of revealing some truths. So what sets the literary hoax separate from the rest of fiction?
The oldest hoaxes are those who falsely attribute a certain text to an imaginative or real deceased author. What grates me is that some of them are pulled off by scholars, thus polluting…

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Goth is [not] Dead: (Sub)Genre-Chat

culture, fantasy, fiction, gothic, history, inspiration, learning, novel, romance, sci-fi, short stories, themes, writing

C. M. Rosens

Horace Walpole is credited/blamed for kicking off the ‘Gothic’ literature genre in 1765 with his novel The Castle of Otranto: A Gothic Tale, which was intended as a subtle joke. Walpole meant ‘Gothic’ in the sense of ‘barbarous’ or ‘derived from the Middle Ages’, but his supernatural tale of perverse obsession and melodramatic tragedy sparked something of a movement to which his epithet was permanently applied.

From the 1790s, novelists like Ann Radcliffe (surely the Grandmother of the Gothic Novel) rediscovered Walpole’s fevered imaginings and ran with them, even though her novels always had natural, Scooby-Doo-esque conclusions finally unravelled by her meddling-kid protagonists. They were beautifully trashy novels, (stereo)typically read by impressionable and repressed young ladies by candlelight (probably with their nightgowns delicately draped over heaving bosoms, which is how I like to imagine it). It took other, braver (or less inhibited) authors like Matthew Lewis and his…

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Genre in Depth: Romance

adult romance, contemporary, fiction, genre, Genre In Depth, hockey romance, new adult, office romance, paranormal romance, recommendations, romance, romantic comedy, sports romance, twilight

Fictionally Sam

Genre in Depth is a new series on Fictionally Sam where we delve into different genre and see how they began, their characteristics, and books within that genre, etc. New genre every first and last Wednesday of the month!

Welcome to February folks, the month of love and chocolates–or if you are super single like me, the month of single awareness. These next 28 days (especially the first 14) are a time here in the States; people from everywhere show their appreciation for those they love through grand gestures, sugary sweets, popping the big question, and taking out the trash without being asked. As for me, this month is a time where I binge read a crap ton of sappy love stories that will remind me that I’m single and my period is about to start. Like I said, a time.

But speaking of love stories–in this installment of Genre…

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FACT: Documentary Doesn’t Mean Fact, Anymore.

cinema, cinematography, documentary, ethics, manipulation, nonfiction

Desiree Lindsay

WAKE UP! Documentary doesn’t necessarily equal facts, at least not anymore. Welcome to the era where documentaries are beginning to dominate as the public’s source of news, information and thought. A recent study found only 6% of Americans feel they have a “great deal of trust in the press.” So with the combination of our lack of trust in news, documentary cinematic and emotional appeal and streaming services such as Hulu and Netflix – documentaries and their views have sky rocketed and drastically evolved over the last two decades.

Documentaries are reaching audiences never before seen. They’re shaping culture and society and now have the power to influence people to change their vote, donate to that cause, consider that person innocent, consider that other person guilty, boycott animal products, boycott this company and aid in propaganda for another. I mean, the list goes on. Point being: documentaries are POWERFUL and…

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